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Quote from a newspaper article reads: "Carolyn Lee, a successful star at four years of age, will have her own little sketch with the Old Timer who will try to induce her to sing the same song she sang with Madeleine Carroll and Fred MacMurray in the Paramount production, "Honeymoon in Bali". Wheeling's own little movie star is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Warren Copp. Mr. Copp is a ceramic engineer and is employed by the Wheeling Steel corporation. The Copp child will share headline honors with another daughter of Wheeling Steel, Miss Betty Bromelow." The Old Timer was a character on the radio broadcast who provided banter and introductions. He was played by Wheeling Steel auditor, John Winchcoll.
"Tony Biacco, steelmaker from Yorkville possesses two strong hands with which he capably handles ductillite and his accordion. His appearances on the family broadcast have been highly commendable. Now a regular in orchestra in 1943."
"Tony Biacco, steelmaker from Yorkville possesses two strong hands with which he capably handles ductillite and his accordion. His appearances on the family broadcast have been highly commendable. Now a regular in orchestra in 1943."
"The Steelmakers accompany Tom Care, employee from the Steubenville Works, as he headlines with a trumpet solo. Tom played "At The End Of a Perfect Day", which appealed to a great number of Wheeling Steel's nation-wide family."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Here's the same quintet on Sunday, running over a number before air time. Lew Davies is the conductor of the program's 23 piece orchestra of mill, plant, and office workers."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Part of Regina Colbert's lunch hour is devoted to catching up on correspondence with service men at home and overseas. The "Singing Secretary" writes weekly to a number of men in uniform." Regina Colbert was a performer on the "It's Wheeling Steel" Radio broadcast. This broadcast was ran exclusively by Wheeling Steel Corp. employees and family members, but as the program grew in popularity they began to hire performers with professional backgrounds, like Regina Colbert. However, in order to comply with his rule of an all employee only run program, he would hire these professionals to work in the offices for a period of time. In Colbert's case, she was hired to work as a secretary in the advertising department.
The Wheeling Musical Steelmakers were a group that would regularly perform on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast, created in 1936 by John L. Grimes who wanted to promote both Wheeling Steel Corporations products and their employees. John Wisvari's day job was a pipe-threader at the Benwood Works.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "When the Musical Steelmakers are heard each Sunday, starting October 5, over at Station ___ at ___ o'clock these three pretty singers, the Steel Sisters, will help add to the gaiety and tunefulness of the programs. They are, from the left, Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, and Lucille Bell. Like other members Musical Steelmakers troupe they are either employees in the steel industry or members of employee families." The first all employee broadcast. The Steel Sisters eventually gained so much recognition that they went on tour with Horace Heidt and his orchestra.
Two of the mill men share coffee, still in their work clothes, after receiving a call to come from the mill to the main office for rehearsal right away. They were preparing to go to Chicago for a war bond program. See original photograph for further description.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Molly Staten and Eleanor Bowman Lynn rehearsed several weeks on their piano duet. They are stenographers from the main office of Wheeling Steel Company." Like all performers and employees on the "It's Wheeling Steel" broadcast, all were also employees or family members of the Wheeling Steel Corporation. They were radio's first all employee only broadcast.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Bill Griffiths makes military equipment during working hours, relaxes in his spare time by duplicating his day's work in miniature. he built the model guns and tanks shown here, and the train that carries them. On Sundays, he's one of the famed "Singing Millmen"." The Singing Millmen were regulars on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "For headlining appearances, auditions for mill workers and members of their immediate families are held every few weeks at the studios of WWVA. Of course, due to the standard set for our program, all that are auditioned can not be presented. The standard set is inferred to be that of the broadcasting station's, thereby relieving the corporation of discrimination."
Everyone pictured is either an employee of the Wheeling Steel Corporation or is an immediate family member of someone who works for them. This family owned and operated broadcast was the first of it's kind and this policy was maintained throughout the broadcast's existence.
The Millmen Quartette were a barbershop quartette that performed regularly on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast from 1936 to 1943.
The Millmen Quartette were a barbershop quartette that performed regularly on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast from 1936 to 1943.
Margaret Cook was a performer on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. Her father, was an electrician at the Steubenville Works.
Ed Kostillo from the pipe mills of the Benwood Works started playing his harmonica to entertain his fellow mill men during lunch hour. Later he won a headliner appearance on the family broadcast with the entire steelmakers orchestra accompanying him.
Ed Kostillo from the pipe mills of the Benwood Works started playing his harmonica to entertain his fellow mill men during lunch hour. Later he won a headliner appearance on the family broadcast with the entire steelmakers orchestra accompanying him.
The brass band of the Martins Ferry Factory had made several headliner appearances on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio program, all of which have stimulated added interest in rehearsals, increased their membership, and assisted in the purchase of new uniforms.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Erma Ellis and Mary Visnick are employed at the Martins Ferry Factory. When dressed in their uniforms these two comely drum majors lead the way when the Martins Ferry Band marches to the broadcast of "It's Wheeling Steel"."
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "The Yorkville Works Brass Band has made several pleasing headliner appearances of the family broadcast. All in their snappy uniforms, thus adding color for the visible audience of "It's Wheeling Steel"."
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Bud Dicarlo's father is a steelmaker from the Benwood Works and Bud worked hard on his accordion solo to please his dad and Wheeling Steel's Nation Wide Family."
John Wincholl, Wheeling Steel Co. auditor played the role of the "Old Timer" who became a popular character on the "It's Wheeling Steel" broadcast. He would introduce acts and provide small talk.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Frank Nalepa deep bass of the Millmen Quartette works every day with coal and scales at the Steubenville Works, rushes to the studio four times a week to rehearse, and found time to regularly visit Pittsburgh for voice lessons to improve his broadcast. Quit for Mit Show." The Millmen Quartette were regulars on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "John Wisvari is a pipe-threader from the Benwood Works, plays violin, and directs his "family" orchestra which he calls "The Polka Kings"." They would perform on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Something unique for any broadcast is an accordion quartet of young ladies. The first is Nancy Row, granddaughter of a founder of Wheeling Corrugating, next is a young lady who, together with her brother is employed at Yorkville. Third's father was employed by the corporation. Fourth is a teacher."
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "The Yorkville High School Girls' Glee Club, 40 in all added to the enjoyment of the Easter broadcast. All 40 girls have at least one immediate family relationship with corporation employees. Many can claim as many as four immediate family relatives who are Wheeling Steelmakers." The entire broadcast was operated and performed by employees or family members of Wheeling Steel throughout the program's entire duration.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Will Stevenson, top tenor of The Millmen Quartette is also employed at the Steubenville Works. Like Frank Nalepa, Will had never sung on a radio network before the family broadcast gave him the opportunity." The Millmen Quartette were regular performers on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast from it's start in 1936.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Val Konyha, a steelmaker from the Yorkville Works brings something unique and different to the family broadcast. Val plays the Hungarian cymbalum, or dulcimer, as we know it, and plays it as well as he handles tin plates."
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Walter Schane from the office of the Benwood Works has been a Wheeling Steelmaker for 18 years. His is the fine baritone voice of the Singing Millmen, who sing on the family broadcast every Sunday. On Show since 1936, now in Singing Millmen 1943." The Singing Millmen were performers on the "Wheeling Musical Steelmakers" radio broadcast.
Walter Schane was the baritone voice of the Singing Millmen and also worked in the office of the Benwood Works. Like all who participated on the radio broadcast, you needed to be an employee or immediate family member of Wheeling Steel.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "The Croatian Tambouritza Orchestra numbers six youthful members, two of whom work for the corporation, the remaining four being children of mill employees." Like all who worked for the broadcast, it was required to be an employee of Wheeling Steel or an immediate family member of an employee.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Verdi Gwynn Howell, machinist in Wheeling's tin mill at Yorkville, Ohio. Howell, born in Wales came to the U.S. in 1926. He was the first saxophonist in the Steelmaker's Orchestra. Howell played a solo on one "It's Wheeling Steel" broadcast which his mother in Wales listened to over a U.S. station."
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Verdi Howells is a machinist at Yorkville, is first saxophonist of The Musical Steelmakers Orchestra, has saved the money made while broadcasting for the corporation, and will go home to visit his mother in Wales this summer." He was an orchestra member since 1936 to November 1943. All participants on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast were required to be employees of Wheeling Steel Corporation or immediate family members.
Caption accompanying photo reads: "John Wisvari is a pipe-threader from the Benwood Works, plays violin, and directs his "Family" orchestra which he calls "The Polka Kings"." The Polka Kings were musicians who played on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Regina Colbert is the program's "Singing Secretary", and she lives up to both halves of the title. Featured soloist on Sundays, she is part of the company's secretarial staff weekdays." It was a requirement set by Wheeling Steel Corporation advertising executive John L. Grimes, that the radio broadcast stay an exclusively all employee program. Therefore, Colbert who was not at the time an employee or immediate family member, was hired to work as secretary in the advertising department to maintain this rule.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Typical Wheeling family, the Evans household has an extra incentive to keep war production rolling. Brother Bill is in the Navy, serving in the South Pacific, and the arrival of a letter from him is a big event in the Evans home. The father, has been a steel roller for 29 years."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Lew Davies, conductor of the "Musical Steelmakers" orchestra and chorus, writes most of the musical arrangements himself. Helping him in this department are John Hahle, guitarist; Maury Longfellow of the production staff; and Gene Ahlers, trumpeter." The Musical Steelmakers were the orchestra who performed on Wheeling Steel Co.'s radio broadcast "It's Wheeling Steel", an all employee broadcast used to advertise both Wheeling Steel's product offerings as well as their large staff.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Here is the Portsmouth Works Male chorus who headline on the family broadcast now from their home town. Organized about the time the family broadcast started, interest has increased due to the opportunity of a nation wide outlet for their talent."
Like all who perform or worked on the "It's Wheeling Steel" Radio Broadcast, Dave Kemp was employed by the company at the Steubenville Works. It was a requirement to be employed or to be an immediate family member of the Wheeling Steel Corporation in order to work on the radio broadcast. This way they could advertise both the company's products as well as it's employees talents, which created a family environment.