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Sara Rehm was a soloist on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. Caption with photograph reads: "Back in Wheeling after less than two days as Cinderella, Sara was greeted by the same home-town band, same cheering citizenry, and at the office, same desk!"
Caption with photograph reads: "The show goes on the air. Variety calls it "the capitalistic Pins and Needles" after the Broadway show of the Ladies Garment Workers' Union (LIFE, Dec. 27). Steelworkers seem to enjoy this company show as much as the garment workers enjoy their union show."
Caption for photograph reads: "The star of the show is Sara Rehm, 19 year old soprano soloist. Miss Rehm qualifies for the show because she works occasionally in the Wheeling office, stuffing envelopes, and has a cousin in the Yorkville Works."
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Rough and ready war workers on week days, polished network musicians on Sundays are these "Musical Steelmakers", pictured here during an informal rehearsal. They are Russ Anderson at the bass, Tony Biacco with the accordion, Verdi Howells the goggled sax man, Jimmy Snodgrass on the drums, and Dayton Powell at the piano."
From left to right: Lois Mae Nolte (seated), B.J. Evans, M.J. Evans, Harriet Drake, John "Old Timer" Wincholl, Regina Colbert, and Taylor (standing).
The Evans Sisters were three sisters who sang on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. The three sisters are: Janet Jean, Betty Jane, and Margaret June.
The Evans Sisters were three sisters who sang on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. The three sisters are: Janet Jean, Betty Jane, and Margaret June.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "They may be network radio stars (heard with the "Musical Steelmakers" each Sunday on the Blue network at 5:30 pm, e.w.t.), but to Mom Evans they are also three mighty good dishwasher who must do their job before going to the broadcast. From left to right are: Janet Jean, Betty Jane, and Margaret June, the singing Evans Sisters."
The Steel Sisters were a singing quartet that were famous on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Man behind the "Musical Steelmakers" is J.L. Grimes, advertising manager of Wheeling Steel. He thought of the program in the first place, and is in active charge now, producing the show, choosing the music, and auditioning talent from the ranks of the employees and their families." It was a requirement to be an employee or immediate family member of Wheeling Steel Corporation in order to perform or work on the radio broadcast.
Part of a "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Shown seated at the piano during a rehearsal of the "Musical Steelmakers", heard Sundays on the Blue network at 5:30 pm, e.w.t., is Margaret June Evans, eldest member of the three Evans Sisters, vocal trio heard during each broadcast of the program. Miss Evans, whose father has worked for the sponsoring company as a steel roller for 29 years, was recently crowned "Miss West Va." by Carl C. Wayman, Commander of the nation's first American Legion Post, located in Wheeling."
From left to right: Margaret June, Betty Jane, and Janet Jean.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "John Winchcoll, the "Old Timer", and Lois Mae Nolte, singing mistress of ceremonies, have been with the "Musical Steelmakers" series from the start. Winchcoll, an auditor with the company, is a veteran employee, who was chosen as representative of the typical Wheeling employee. Miss Nolte, though only 19, has been on the show in all its seven years, first as one of the Steel Sisters, later as a soloist."
Performance was part of a "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
The Musical Steelmakers were the orchestra that performed on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast on NBC's Blue Network. Note the flag behind the performers on stage. The blue stars represented people who were serving in the war, and a gold star represented those who died in service.
"It's Wheeling Steel" was a radio broadcast used to advertise Wheeling Steel Corporation products and their talented employees. The entire operation was ran by employees or immediate family members of the company, the first all employee broadcast.
Orchestra leader Tom Whitley is the man wearing glasses on far left pointing forward. The orchestra was the primary performer on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. The show was eventually taken to the road, as evident by the "coast to coast" sign.
The Steel Sisters (Lois Mae Nolte, Harriet Drake, and Lucille Bell) were regular performers on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. They eventually left the broadcast to tour with Horace Heidt and his orchestra.
The Musical Steelmakers were the orchestra for the Wheeling Steel Corporation owned "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. It was made up of multi-talented employees of the company who also performed on the broadcast.
The Old Timer was a character on the radio broadcast who introduced the acts and provided banter in between music. Maury Longfellow was a member of broadcast's production staff, he also assisted in writing musical arrange for the The Wheeling Musical Steelmakers, the broadcasts orchestra.
It's Wheeling Steel was a radio broadcast started in 1936 by Wheeling Steel Corporation advertising executive John L. Grimes. He wanted to advertise both the company's products and it's talented employees.
Notice the flag in the background with 13 stars, this was displayed commonly during World War 2 to show how many people who were serving. Gold stars would represent those who died in the war.
Lamonte O'Brien was a musician who played on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast. He was well known for his unique ability to mimic the sound of a trumpet using only his hands, which he would often use to solo.
She was referred to as the "Kate Smith" of the family broadcast. Kate Smith was best known for her rendition of "God Bless America".
Like all who perform or worked on the "It's Wheeling Steel" Radio Broadcast, Dave Kemp was employed by the company at the Steubenville Works. It was a requirement to be employed or to be an immediate family member of the Wheeling Steel Corporation in order to work on the radio broadcast. This way they could advertise both the company's products as well as it's employees talents, which created a family environment.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Here is the Portsmouth Works Male chorus who headline on the family broadcast now from their home town. Organized about the time the family broadcast started, interest has increased due to the opportunity of a nation wide outlet for their talent."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Lew Davies, conductor of the "Musical Steelmakers" orchestra and chorus, writes most of the musical arrangements himself. Helping him in this department are John Hahle, guitarist; Maury Longfellow of the production staff; and Gene Ahlers, trumpeter." The Musical Steelmakers were the orchestra who performed on Wheeling Steel Co.'s radio broadcast "It's Wheeling Steel", an all employee broadcast used to advertise both Wheeling Steel's product offerings as well as their large staff.
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Typical Wheeling family, the Evans household has an extra incentive to keep war production rolling. Brother Bill is in the Navy, serving in the South Pacific, and the arrival of a letter from him is a big event in the Evans home. The father, has been a steel roller for 29 years."
Caption on back of photograph reads: "Regina Colbert is the program's "Singing Secretary", and she lives up to both halves of the title. Featured soloist on Sundays, she is part of the company's secretarial staff weekdays." It was a requirement set by Wheeling Steel Corporation advertising executive John L. Grimes, that the radio broadcast stay an exclusively all employee program. Therefore, Colbert who was not at the time an employee or immediate family member, was hired to work as secretary in the advertising department to maintain this rule.
Caption accompanying photo reads: "John Wisvari is a pipe-threader from the Benwood Works, plays violin, and directs his "Family" orchestra which he calls "The Polka Kings"." The Polka Kings were musicians who played on "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast.
Caption accompanying photograph reads: "Verdi Howells is a machinist at Yorkville, is first saxophonist of The Musical Steelmakers Orchestra, has saved the money made while broadcasting for the corporation, and will go home to visit his mother in Wales this summer." He was an orchestra member since 1936 to November 1943. All participants on the "It's Wheeling Steel" radio broadcast were required to be employees of Wheeling Steel Corporation or immediate family members.