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Located inside 4-H Club cottage. West Penn Public Service Co.
Signs on cottage read: "Electric kitchens; Electric Laundries."
In the front row, from left to right, are Dove Hunohrey, Wallace Craft, Leon Jarvis, and Cris Thompson.Standing, from left to right, are William Craft, Pete Radzue, Eddie Jarvis, Theodore Dixon, Buss Royer, and Virgil Dillon.The "bat-boys" in the forefront of the photograph are Dyke Janeski and Edgar Foster.
American president Franklin D. Roosevelt inspected the Pacific Fleet, including the U.S.S. West Virginia.
An unidentified boy is pictured beside the machinery.
An interior look inside the cottage which holds the electrical apparatus machinery.
Participants in the fashion show gather along the stairs. Subjects unidentified.
A group of campers sit on a lawn outside of a log cabin while listening to a speaker.
Portrait of Maryat Lee and her family at Christmas. Pictured left to right are her father, Dewitt Collins Lee, her brother Robert E. "Buzz" Lee holding hands with Maryat, and her oldest brother John Lee holding hands with her mother Grace Dyer Lee.Maryat Lee (born Mary Attaway Lee; May 26, 1923 – September 18, 1989) was an American playwright and theatre director who made important contributions to post-World War II avant-garde theatre.  She pioneered street theatre in Harlem, and later founded EcoTheater in West Virginia, a community based theater project.Early in her career, Lee wrote and produced plays in New York City, including the street play “DOPE!”  While in New York she also formed the Soul and Latin Theater (SALT), and wrote plays centered around the lives of the actors in the group.In 1970 Lee moved to West Virginia and formed the community theater group EcoTheater in 1975.  Beginning with local teenagers from the Governor’s Summer Youth Program, the rural theater group grew, and produced plays based on oral histories collected from the local community.  Each performance of an EcoTheater play involved audience participation and discussion.  With the assistance of the Humanities Foundation of West Virginia, guest scholars became a part of EcoTheater.
Maryat Lee (born Mary Attaway Lee; May 26, 1923 – September 18, 1989) was an American playwright and theatre director who made important contributions to post-World War II avant-garde theatre.  She pioneered street theatre in Harlem, and later founded EcoTheater in West Virginia, a community based theater project.Early in her career, Lee wrote and produced plays in New York City, including the street play “DOPE!”  While in New York she also formed the Soul and Latin Theater (SALT), and wrote plays centered around the lives of the actors in the group.In 1970 Lee moved to West Virginia and formed the community theater group EcoTheater in 1975.  Beginning with local teenagers from the Governor’s Summer Youth Program, the rural theater group grew, and produced plays based on oral histories collected from the local community.  Each performance of an EcoTheater play involved audience participation and discussion.  With the assistance of the Humanities Foundation of West Virginia, guest scholars became a part of EcoTheater.
Col. Ted McDowell pictured in the front row between men wearing light collars.
Dalf Lowry (left), Fred McDaniels (middle), and Joe Mann (right) pictured at Willowood Football Field, near Greenbrier River Bridge abutment.