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Buildings and stores line the dirt road where people go about their daily business.
The Hinton Baking Co. entrance is covered in snow. The sidewalk nearby appears to have been shoveled clear.
An old automobile decorated with American flags is pictured at the intersection of 3rd Avenue and Temple Street.
The postcard caption reads: "A mid winter pause at The Women's Farm near Hinton.  The great wings of mountains hover in frozen flight above this holler which is the home of EcoTheater and a center for the arts in southern West Virginia."Maryat Lee named her home near Hinton, W. Va. "The Women's Farm." It was her home and the home of EcoTheater until Lee moved to Lewisburg, W. Va. in 1984.Maryat Lee (born Mary Attaway Lee; May 26, 1923 – September 18, 1989) was an American playwright and theatre director who made important contributions to post-World War II avant-garde theatre.  She pioneered street theatre in Harlem, and later founded EcoTheater in West Virginia, a community based theater project.Early in her career, Lee wrote and produced plays in New York City, including the street play “DOPE!”  While in New York she also formed the Soul and Latin Theater (SALT), and wrote plays centered around the lives of the actors in the group.In 1970 Lee moved to West Virginia and formed the community theater group EcoTheater in 1975.  Beginning with local teenagers from the Governor’s Summer Youth Program, the rural theater group grew, and produced plays based on oral histories collected from the local community.  Each performance of an EcoTheater play involved audience participation and discussion.  With the assistance of the Humanities Foundation of West Virginia, guest scholars became a part of EcoTheater.
The caption on the postcard reads: "The moment of John Henry's victory, seconds before he dies. Performance of "John Henry" by EcoTheatre, the indigenous summer theater company of Summers County young people. Kathy Jackson in the title role.""John Henry" was a successful EcoTheater play that was performed often.Maryat Lee (born Mary Attaway Lee; May 26, 1923 – September 18, 1989) was an American playwright and theatre director who made important contributions to post-World War II avant-garde theatre.  She pioneered street theatre in Harlem, and later founded EcoTheater in West Virginia, a community based theater project.Early in her career, Lee wrote and produced plays in New York City, including the street play “DOPE!”  While in New York she also formed the Soul and Latin Theater (SALT), and wrote plays centered around the lives of the actors in the group.In 1970 Lee moved to West Virginia and formed the community theater group EcoTheater in 1975.  Beginning with local teenagers from the Governor’s Summer Youth Program, the rural theater group grew, and produced plays based on oral histories collected from the local community.  Each performance of an EcoTheater play involved audience participation and discussion.  With the assistance of the Humanities Foundation of West Virginia, guest scholars became a part of EcoTheater.
Three unidentified children sit inside the vehicle decorated with streamers and American flags on Temple Street.
A young girl looks out from behind the rear of the vehicle while two adults drive it down Temple Street. Subjects unidentified.
The two decorated vehicles make their way down Temple Street. The float in back advertises Plumley-Hulme Co.
The photo is captioned, "3 Crooks."
The photograph is titled, "Irish Nut." An unidentified man sits on the railing while holding his hat.
Three unidentified men put their arms around each others shoulders while posing on the bridge.
A. S. O. students march alongside the wagon of newlyweds. Subjects unidentified.