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Looking west on the tramroad, carts loaded with coal are pulled on a conveyor line to the railroad and river tipples by the Kanawha River.
Filled coal carts belong to the Cedar Grove Collieries Inc. & Supply Co. sit in a line on the barges beside the river.
A coal miner at the Cedar Grove Collieries Inc. & Supply Co. mine observes as a loading boom drops coal between the rails into a hopper, which is carried by a conveyor to the river tipple and barges.
The first train to cross over the new bridge of the Virginian Railway at Deep Water, West Virginia. The river is probably the Kanawha River.
The "Wild Goose" towboat pictured in a winter setting, was powered by steam stern wheel and built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Towboat "James Rumsey" built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
200'-0" towboat "Indiana"-hull 83, built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Launching set for towboat "Indiana" built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
The contest resulted in the Charles Ward Engineering designed, smaller, twin screw propeller, "James Rumsey" pulling and pushing the steam powered, stern wheel "D. T. Lane", therefore the "James Rumsey" was declared the winner.
Launch of Indiana Turbine Electric Towboat built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia. Note the reaction of those on board as the ship is launched.
Launch of the Indiana Turbine Electric Towboat built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Launch of the U.S.L.H.S. Greenbrier built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
U.S.L.H.S. Greenbrier, vessel built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Launching of the towboat "Geo T. Price". This ship was built by the Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia. Note how the men on board brace themselves during the launch.
Pilot house on the vessel, "Geo T. Price" built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Post launch of the "General Frank M. Coxe". This ship was built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Launching Of Steamship "Gen. J. McE. Hyde". Ship was built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Construction of the ship "Duncan Bruce" built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
The Destrehan running on steam power. Built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
Launch of towboat, Destrehan on the Kanawha River. Built by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia.
The "Beverly" designed by The Charles Ward Engineering Works in Charleston, West Virginia, running on the Kanawha River.
Steam towboat made by Charles Ward Engineering Works of Charleston, West Virginia. Note behind the boat, on the bank, left is the Ward Boilers Factory and on the right is the South Side Foundry.
The launching of a Ward Engineering towboat probably on the Kanawha River. Ward Engineering Works was an iron and steel fabricator and shipyard founded by Charles Ward in 1872.
"Looking west on tramroad showing mine cars loaded with coal, head house, conveyor line, railroad tipple, river tipple and Kanawha River."
'Lock 4 and bridge at Chelyan, West Virginia (right).  Looking east at mile 22.8.'
'Plant of Electro Metallurigical Company at Alloy, West Virginia, seven miles below Gauley River.'
'Looking downstream west northwest at mile 10.7.  Montgomery, West Virginia.'
'Looking north at junction of the New and Gauley Rivers, forming the Kanawha River.  Town of Gauley Bridge, West Virginia.'
'London Lock under construction by Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, to replace Lock 2, two miles upstream.  Handley, West Virginia, at right, London at left.  Chesapeake and Ohio in foreground.  New York Central and route 60 beyond river.  Looking east southeast 14 miles below mouth of Gauley River.'
'United States Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia.  View inside the cofferdam for the weir part of the dam, taken from the center pier. Showing the two unfinished lines of permanent cribs, and the unfinished concrete core between them, for the foundation of the weir. The sheer piling, driven to make the excavation and place the foundations for the shore abutment, shown in far end of cofferdam. The foundations of this dam rest on hardpan - an indurated clay - from 18 to 24 feet below extreme low water at the site. The tower for the cable way across the river (on the line of the dam), concrete plant, stone yard, etc., shown in the distance."
'View inside the cofferdam for the weir part of the dam. Taken from the center pier. Building and filling  (with loose stone) the permanent cribs for the weir foundation in progress. Also excavating the 'stop-off ditch' in the hardpan to form part of the concrete core between the two lines of cribs. The foundations of this dam rest on hardpan - an indurated clay - from 18 to 24 feet below extreme low-water mark.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Showing the weir part of the dam (from the center pier looking toward the abutment) after the wickets and service bridge had been placed inside the cofferdam. The wickets and service bridge standing.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Inside the cofferdam for the weir part of the dam, after the wickets and service bridge had been placed. Showing four wickets and two trestles standing next to the center pier. One of the wickets is 'on the swing' (en bascule). Vertical height of weir wicket above sill, 8 feet 6 inches; width between centers, 4 feet. Weir bridge trestles 12 feet high, spaced 8 feet apart.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Chanoine Wicket Dam. Showing the weir part of the dam (from center pier looking toward abutment) after the wickets and service bridge had been placed inside the cofferdam. The wicket and trestle chains and part of the aprons for the bridge were yet to be placed. (See views taken same day, showing the wickets and service bridge standing.)'
' U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. From left or abutment bank looking inside the cofferdam for the weir and abutment. Laying masonry, placing concrete and wicket anchorage, and channeling for anchor ditch, etc., for the foundation of the weir in progress. The lock (shown in the distance) was completed, except the gates. The navigation pass (being that part of the dam next to the lock) and the center pier were finished in 1896.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Inside the cofferdam for the weir part of the dam after the wickets and service bridge had been placed. Showing three wickets standing and one 'on swing' next to the abutment. Wickets in foreground lowered. The chains for the wickets and bridge trestles were yet to be placed. Vertical height of weir wickets above sill, 8 feet 6 inches; width between centers, 4 feet. Bridge trestles 12 feet high, spaced 8 feet apart.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Looking inside the cofferdam for the weir part of the dam. Unfinished walls, concrete and puddle core, and wicket anchorage for the weir foundations shown in foreground. The coping and sills are in place next to the center pier.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia.Looking inside of cofferdam for the weir part of the dam. Setting masonry, placing concrete, and puddle and wicket anchorage in progress.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. General view of work from the top of the bank near the head of the lock. Work on the foundations for the weir part of the dam in progress inside of the cofferdam. (See views taken the same day inside the cofferdam.) The lock was completed except the gates, which were yet to be placed. The foundations for the navigation pass (being the part of the dam next to the lock) were finished in 1896.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Lock and Dam No. 7 - Inside of first section of cofferdam for navigation pass. Mixing and placing concrete in progress. Upper wall and guard sill, and part of lower wall and coping, set. Rods and disks for wicket anchorage in place and partly concreted around. Ends of rods forming bridge anchorage shown just below guard sill. Taken October 1, 1891.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Lock and Dam No. 7 - Inside of first section of cofferdam for navigation pass, next to lock wall, after completion of foundations. One wicket and one service-bridge trestle in place. The wicket 'on the swing.' Taken November 20, 1891.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Lock and Dam No. 7 - Lock looking downstream. The derricks have just been taken out of the chamber and the removal of the cofferdamn is about to begin. The most of the coping is set on the lock walls. Taken October 1, 1891.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Lock and Dam No. 7 - Inside of first section of cofferdam for navigation pass, next to lock wall, after completion of foundations. One wicket and one service-bridge trestle in place, standing. Taken November 20, 1891.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Lock and Dam No. 8 - View of lock, looking downstream. Taken September 30, 1891.'
'U.S. Improvement, Great Kanawha River, West Virginia. Lock and Dam No.8 - Inside of first section of cofferdam for navigation pass. Taken from the lock wall. Taken July 1, 1892. The upper guard sill and downstream wall are finished, and the concreting is done. The main longitudinal timbers are all placed. The wicket sill as far as shown lacks the cap piece, sill irons and plate, of being finished. The setting of coping, paving, work on wicket sill, and the placing of fixed irons - wicket and trestle boxes, hurters and slides, etc., in progress. (There was a little water on top of the paving between the guard and wicket sills when the picture was taken.)'
'w/ Jim Kidd.'
'Point Pleasant, junction, Great Kanawha and the Ohio. Monument on the site of Battle of Point Pleasant, October 10, 1774.'
''Steamboat around the bend.' This river-borne expression can be heard daily in southern West Virginia where steamboating is still a thriving mode of industrial transportation.This picture was taken at confluence of the Kanawha and Ohio rivers at Point Pleasant, Mason County.'
'The new 400,000 kilowatt Kanawha River Plant of Appalachian Electric Power Company at Glasgow, West Virginia, as it appears from the river side. The first of two 200,000 kilowatt units is now in service. The second unit is scheduled for completion late this fall.'
'The Chimneys of the salt works pour forth, at short intervals of space, their curling masses of black vapor, while swarms of laborers, and others connected with these establishments, are continually passing to and for, presenting a pleasing coup d'oeil of incessant activity and industry. Nature, indeed, seems to have been prodigal in her bounties to this intersecting region. The Contiguous forest having been almost stripped to supply the fuels to the salt-furnaces; the precious mineral so necessary to human comfort, must have remained for ever useless but for the discovery of inexhaustible beds of coal, so convenient of access as to make the cost of procuring it scarcely worth considering. Sometimes, by suitable platforms and inclined culverts, it is thrown from the mountain-side immediately to the door of the manufactory, and when more remote from the place of consumption, it is transported with equal ease, in wagons or cars, over rail-roads constructed for the purpose'
Falls of the Kanawha. Old Stockton Tavern and coach on James River and Kanawha Turnpike.
View of Kanawha Falls near the Gauley Bridge in Fayette County.
Gauley Bridge where the Gauley and New River form the Kanawha.
'Completion of Main Structure. General view looking upstream. M 81 ContW516Eng.607.  U.S. Engineer Office, Huntington, W. Va.'
Homes sit along the banks of the Kanawha River in Charleston, W. Va.
View of Charleston and the Kanawha River.
View of Charleston, W. Va. and the Kanawha River.
The view of Charleston, West Virginia through a bridge crossing the river.
Cut No. 1, This is a photograph of the immense combination bridge across the Kanawha River in South Charleston, now in process of Construction.  This bridge is made to accomodate both the steam and trolley traffic and also foot-passengers.  The illustration here given, shows the Concrete Piers which are nearly 20 feet thick and 90 feet high.  It also shows the wooden superstructure necessary in the process of erecting the middle span of the bridge.
Copy of painting by A.M. Doddridge, 1863- Army camp just below C. and O. depot site near mouth of Ferry Branch.  Fort Scammon hill in the distance.
Copy of painting by A.M. Doddridge, 1863- Army camp just below Chesapeake and Ohio Depot site near mouth of Ferry Branch on the Kanawha river.  Fort Scammon Hill in the distance.  President Hayes and McKinley were stationed in camp.