Search Constraints

You searched for: Geographic Names Potomac River. Remove constraint Geographic Names: Potomac River.
Number of results to display per page

Search Results

'Amusements--Dancing in a large dance hall, overhanging the cliffs below.  Tennis, bass fishing, horseback riding, hiking and motoring over good roads to nearby places of interest.  Among these are Antitam battlefield, 15 miles; Charles Town, 8 miles, where John Brown was tried and hung; South Mountain 'the Geo. Alfred Townsend Arch', 10 miles; Frederick, the home of Francis Scott Key and Barbara Frietchie, 19 miles; Braddock Heights, 24 miles; Winchester, 30 miles; Endless Caverns, Luray Caverns and Gettysburg, from 50 to 70 miles. Railroad--On the main line of the B. and O.  There are numerous through trains a day for Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York; also for Chicago, Cincinnati and St. Louis.  Fifty-six miles from Washington, our nearest large city. T. S. Lovett, Proprietor.'
View includes the College campus, the Potomac River and Shepherdstown in Jefferson County, West Virginia.
One of the nine reconstructed bridges (on the same spot) connecting Harpers Ferry over the Potomac River to Maryland. This bridge was also eventually destroyed during the Civil War.
The South Branch of the Potomac River flowing by the base of Castle Rock.
Postcard of Lovers' Leap and Potomac River in Morgan County, W. Va.
The Potomac River is on the Left.
The Bloomington Bridge, finished around 1842, was part of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's route past Piedmont, W. Va. The bridge crosses the North Branch Potomac River.
"Power house at dam near Shepherdstown"
Below Petersburg.
This image is part of the Thompson Family of Canaan Valley Collection. The Thompson family played a large role in the timber industry of Tucker County during the 1800s, and later prospered in the region as farmers, business owners, and prominent members of the Canaan Valley community.
This image is part of the Thompson Family of Canaan Valley Collection. The Thompson family played a large role in the timber industry of Tucker County during the 1800s, and later prospered in the region as farmers, business owners, and prominent members of the Canaan Valley community.