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General Averell and his men in the rain during the raid on Salem. The men rode through pelting rain and in freezing weather. From a sketch in Harpers Weekly, Jan 16, 1864. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's West Virginia in the Civil War.
Sketch of a men gathered for a militia meeting. General muster of militia at a West Virginia county seat before the Civil War, required to be held at least once each year. No uniforms were provided, and few were owned and worn-officers were distinguished by colored sashes and each man provided his own arms. Because of division in the ranks, these county militia regiments were of little use in the Civil War. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
'Morgans Raiders are bound for Wheeling.' Excitement in the McClure House due to news of war. In the group, right, leaning against the stair rail is Hon. Wlm E. Stevenson, of Parkersburg, President of the 1863 senate and later governor; wearing a white hat is Leroy Kramer, Capt. Kramer Guards and 1864 Speaker of the House; James C. McGrew, Preston Co., later a Congressman, reads newspaper, Archibald W. Campbell, editor of the Wheeling Intelligencer with hands clasped behind his back. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Nancy Hart, who rode with Perry Conleys Moccasin Raiders. From the ambrotype taken at Summersville, only known photo of the lady guerilla. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610, Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War,' and Charles Shetler's 'West Virginia Civil War Literature,' entry 220, file 50.
Portrait of Private William McKinley, Jr. of Company E. 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. From a photo of the 18 year old Poland, Ohio lad which was probably taken at Camp Chase, Ohio before he left for the West Virginia front. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Brig. Gen. John D. Imboden, who led a raiding force through West Virginia for 37 days. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
Sketch of a military execution. Before the war ended there were many such scenes enacted in the meadow that is now Charlestons West Side. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
Sketch of Parkersburg during Civil War. Gateway to the interior by water and rail, it was a busy military forwarding center during the war. Terminal of the Northwestern Virginia Railroad, branch of the Baltimore and Ohio from Grafton, river port, and headquarters of the U.S. Navy tin-clad patrol boats it was a key point in the western defense. The long, low building along the river was the railroad freight station. See Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Blowing up the highway-railroad bridge at Harpers Ferry in the early morning of June 14, 1861 when Confederate Brigadier General Joseph E. Johnston and his Army evacuated the town. The bridge was completely destroyed - a fate it was to suffer by fire and flood nine times during the civil war. From a sketch in Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
A section of the National Military Cemetery at Grafton. The tall shaft at the extreme right marks the grave of Bailey Brown, 2nd West Virginia Infantry, the first man killed by an enrolled Confederate soldier in the Civil War.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Junction of the Anthony's Creek Road and the James River and Kanawha Turnpike 'now route 60' where Averell's force met Patton's brigade in a head on collision. This was the scene of the fiercest fighting; the road in the center was filled with the dead and wounded.  Photo taken about 1912 is from Mac Corkle's 'White Sulphur Springs. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
The 7th West Virginia Infantry, USV, calls a truce with the 12th Virginia Cavalry, CSA. Bob Goodwin, left, Yankee doughboy, and Ed Gaskins, Confederate horse soldier, leaders of the Morgantown Muzzle Loaders Club, take time out while on a field trip. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Brig. Gen. William E. Jones who led the most successful confederate raid in West Virginia in 1863. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
At least eighteen soldier newspapers were published in W. Va. during the Civil War.  Shown are the headings of eight of them, ranging from Martinsburg to Point Pleasant, and from Clarksburg to Lewisburg. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
The John Brown Bell at Marlborough, Massachusetts, hanging over the street from the top of the second story window of the Grand Army Legion Building. It was 'liberated' by Marlborough men in 1861, but it was thirty years before it reached their home city. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Bronze replica of Houdon's statue of General George Washington at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington. 'Captured' in June, 1864 by General David Hunter, it was removed to Wheeling where it stood until 1866 when it was restored to Virginia by legislative action.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Belle Boyd, Confederate spy known as the Siren of the Shenandoah. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
The War Correspondents Monument, a 50 foot high structure which sits in the middle of Crampton Gap, South Mountain, a few miles east of Harpers Ferry. Erected through the efforts of George Alfred Townsend, himself a famous war correspondent in the Civil War, known as 'Gath,' the monumental arch was dedicated on October 16, 1896. Now under the care of the National Park Service, surrounded by Gathland Park, a Maryland recreation center, the arch was re-dedicated  on October 16, 1946, to the correspondents of all wars. Marble tablets bear the names of 147 Civil War correspondents and artists, while ranged at the end four bronze tablets tell the action in Crampton Gap, and important phases in the battle of South Mountain. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
The skirmish at Middle Fork Bridge, as seen by Henri Lovie, sketch artist for 'Leslie's Weekly' who accompaned the detachment of the 3rd Ohio Infantry under Captain Lawson.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
The historic old covered bridge at Philippi, completed in 1852, has been in continuous use for 109 years and still serves to carry the heavy traffic on U. S. Highway 250 across the Tygarts Valley River. Veteran of the Civil War, it was the first bridge captured, and was used throughout the war by troops of both armies.   It has had its own centennial celebration, and now will be a center of attraction in the observance of the centennial of the first land battle of the Civil War. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Burning of the U.S. Armory and Arsenal at Harpers Ferry on the night of April 18, 1861. From a sketch in Leslies Weekly. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Monument erected to commemorate the seventh W. Va. Vol. Infantry on the Gettysburg Battlefield. One of four W. Va. Memorials. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
The first two classes of the West Virginia Civil War medal, front and back. For the Honorably Discharged and for those killed in battle, front and back.  See West Virginia Collection pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Letters mailed from W. Va. Post Offices bearing Confederate postmarks. In the lot are ones from Travellers Repose 'now Bartow', Shepherdstown, Union, Harpers Ferry, Lewisburg, Romney, and Fayetteville. Comes from the Collections of Col. Harvey E. Sheppard, Fort Hood, TX and Geo. N. Malpass, St. Petersburg FL. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Private Archibald H. Rowand, Jr. of Company K, 1st West Virginia Cavalry. He became senior scout attached to the staff of Union General Phil Sheridan, and was awarded the Medal of Honor.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
W. Va. flag borne by the 13th Infantry - one of the last preserved of the Civil War Flags when furled and cased more than fifty years ago. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Colonel Henry Capehart of Wheeling (later Brevet Major General), who commanded the WV Cavalry Brigade at Cedar Creek where his troopers struck terror in the ranks of the Johnny Rebs.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Sketched portrait of James E. Hall, Co. H., 31st VA Infantry, who saw the Civil War begin and end. From picture made in the mid-1880s.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Major Kellion V. Whaley who commanded a recruit camp of 9th West Virginia Infantry at Guyandotte; captured when the camp was broken up by Confederate cavalry raiders.  Congressman for Virginia and West Virginia, 1861-1867. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'West Virginia in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Brig. General Frederick W. Lander, who served with distinction in many western (West) Virginia campaigns and others including the Romney Expedition, refusing to surrender Hancock, Md. to Stonewall Jackson and  personally leading a successful charge at Bloomery Gap. He died two weeks after the battle in March 2, 1862.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Captain Joseph M. Brown, CSA, of Charleston and Madison. He made the last payment to Confederate troops while with Jefferson Davis and party in flight to the South.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Issac H. Duval, Wellsburg, Brigadier General and Brevet Major General. He filibustered in Cuba with Lopez before the Civil War.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Honorable George W. Summers of Charleston. He tried to make peace.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Colonel John C. Paxton, 2nd WV Cavalry.  He lost the skirmish at Tuckwiller's Hill and was retired to private life.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Colonel Turner Ashby, Knights of the Shenondoah, who led the Confederate troops in the first battle of Bolirer Heights.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Colonel George S. Patton, Charleston lawyer, who commanded an infantry brigade at the Battle of Droop Mountain. he is the grandfather of World War II United States Army General George S. Patton. West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Emanuel Willis Wilson of Kanawha. 7th Governor of WV.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Captain William G. Fuller, Telegraph Corps, who built and maintained some 700 miles of military telegraph wires in West Virginia, ranging from the Tygarts Valley to Princeton. He was later promoted to Colonel.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Maj Gen. Tho. L. Rosser, CSA. He captured Beverly in January 1865, despite snow, cold, and high water. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Maj. Gen. Thomas Maley Harris, commander of the 10th West Virginia Regiment and subsequently a brigade and a division under Sheridan. At Appomattox- his troops silenced the last battery put in position by the Army of Northern Virginia.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Brevet Major General David Hunter Strother, of Berkeley Springs, who is perhaps best known as the "Porte Crayon" author and artist. From a wartime sketch made by J.H. Diss Debar.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
West Virginia's Memorial to the Fourth WV Infantry at Vicksburg National Military Park. The shaft is sermounted by a colossal bronze bust of General Arza M. Goodspeed, who was killed in the May 19th assault on the city's defensive works.    See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
The old Revolutionary relic captured by the 44th Ohio Infantry at the battle of Lewisburg. It was surrendered by Cornwallis at Yorktown in 1781. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Peregrine Hays 'Left' and Geo. W. Silcott, 'Moccasin Ranger' diplomats who negotiated the Spencer Truce. General Kelly dissented. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Group portrait of the Civil War Centennial Commission, created to plan and coordinate the series of observances and commemoration of VA centenary of the Civil War in West Virginia. Seated left to right: George N. Cobbs, S. Charlston; Major Thorton T. Perry, Jr, Charles Town; Colonel J.W. Benjamin, Lewisburg; and Delf Norona, Moundsville, Secretary-Treasurer. Standing left to right; Boyd Stutler, Charleston; Judge Charles W. Fergerson, Wayne; and Dr. E.E. Myers, Philippi, Chairman.  See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610.
Portrait of Lt. Gen Tho. J. 'Stonewall ' Jackson. As a colonel commanding a brigade he had his first Civil War action at Falling Waters, Berkeley County. Three weeks later he was 'Stonewall' at the first Battle of Bull Run. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Lt. Gen. Tho. J. Jackson.  He made a winter march in January, 1862 and cleared the South Branch Valley. Resigned when political maneuvering ordered evacuation of Romney. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'
Portrait of Cap. John Hanson McNeill, Left, organizer and first commander of the McNeill Rangers. Right, Portrait of Cap. Jesse C. McNeill, second captain who named Cumberland and kidnapped Gen. S. Crook and Kelley. See West Virginia Collection Pamphlet 6610 and Boyd Stutler's 'WV in the Civil War.'